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20121001
20121031
STATION
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
WETA 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
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English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
it. featured speakers include simon johnson, former chief economist with the imf, and karen petrou. this is just over an hour: >> thank you very much. i certainly hope and expect that this discussion will be as stimulating and exciting as the last panel. each of the panelists will speak for about ten minutes, and then we'll have an opportunity for colloquy among the panelists and then open for questions to the audience. we'll go in the following order, scheherazade will start us off, then anna will be second, simon third and karen fourth. so, scheherazade, please, kick us off. >> thank you. thank you, art. it's a pleasure to be here at she leaf's annual event. i will try not to put you too much into a gloomy mood. [laughter] if you're going to discuss the business of trying to predict what possibly is the next financial crisis, i think it's important to discuss the changing nature of these crises. thirty years ago we had what we now affectionately call the traditional type of crisis, only happened in emerging markets, and the contagion of this crisis was regional. so if brazil got
that there would be if the government had cuts of that kind. you had simone campbell on who pointed out that there's a study by bread for the world showing if you took the food stamp cuts, every church would have to come up with $50,000. most churches don't have that money. you shouldn't be cutting people off food stamps and expecting groups to pick up all that slack. >> ryan has said that 30% of americans want a welfare state. 30% of people are takers. how does he square those comments with this visit here? what was it all about? >> i think it's been clear for awhile, especially since the 47% video, that the republicans said whoops, where did that compassionate conservatism go. we better show we have a heart somehow because those comments are hurting us. they don't want to talk about budgets. they want to put out feel-good words and mitt romney offered some of those in the first debate. and they want to give us pictures that say we have big hearts. well, you can't make bricks without straw. show us what your priorities are. some of it should come from voluntarily contributions, but we built these
there are security issues still persist, barbara simons is an expert on electronic voting and on the advisor of the election commission and her book is called broken ballots will your votes counties, welcome. >> thank you very much, it is a pleasure. >> you have been involved in computer science most of your adult left. >> i have a ph.d. >> rose: yes. that qualifies you. how did you get invved in this, though, the technology of voting? >> well, in 2003, a colleague of mine, david dill, a professor at stanford discovered that silicon centrally, santa clara county was about to buy voting machines to be used there and several of us were just astounded because as computer scientists we know that the computers and the voting machines can have software bugs or even hidden malicious code so we got involved. >> rose: as all computers. >> like all computers, exactly and so we got involved, with trying to stop this purchase, in silicon valley and right in the heart of silicon valley and we didn't succeed. >> rose: you could not change the direction. >> we lost three to two. the election officials want
a fox news contributor. simon rosenberg, the president and founder of the new democrat network. a former clinton campaign advisor. you heard governor romney there in florida. florida has had its share of misery. i was living there when hurricane andrew hit. how do you conduct a political campaign in this environment, simon, you know, when so many people are hurting, have no power, the last thing they want to hear or on television on the radio is another attacked a? >> well i think there, the president is being the president. i mean he's out, obviously at red cross and at fema and he is clearly leading the recovery effort right now. i think he has a little bit of a political advantage over mitt romney in the sense that mitt romney is just a candidate trying to talk about what is going on when the president has the advantage of actually being responsible for the recovery effort right now. and i think he is doing a good job. he has been praised by pub be republicans and democrats alike last few days for being responsive to their needs. he is going up to new jersey with chris christie to tak
riesirita simon. >>> president barack obama and mitt romney square off wednesday night in denver. both trying to lower expectations practically gushing over one another, but new jersey governor chris christie is going against the grain and setting the bar high for the republican nominee. >>er time mitt romney has been confronted in this campaign with one of these moments, he has come through in a debate and performed extraordinarily well laying out his vision very clearly and also contrasting himself with his vision with hoomp his opponent was at that time. so i have absolute confidence when we get to thursday morning, george, you'll be shaking your head saying it's a brand new race with 33 dap days to go. >> you almost never hear that. doing well in a debate. what on earth was chris christie doing? live from washington in an undisclosed location at the bureau, peter what was chris christie doing there? >> i have no idea, john. do you? this flies in the face of everything the romney campaign's been trying to do for the last few week. his senior adviser beth myers put out something sayi
fun. hey, roger, simon, this is monday afternoon satire on tape. >> i heard that at the debate, they're going to ask the candidates questions and the candidates are then going to respond to those questions. >> i think -- that's the traditional format. i don't know. i don't know if they're going to stick to the traditional debate format. >> we'll have to wait and see. >> it would be important what they say. >> what they say is going to be sort of the overarcing theme of this debate. what they say will be incredibly important. >> will they -- >> that will be the most important thing and the tone that they use as they speak. >> right. and how they look and do they double down or walk it back? >> right. >> people will be watching for the doubling down, walking back. >> or walking back. >> and game change moments. >> guys, ultimately, we're not going to know untilt the exit polls on election. even after the debate, after you hear the questions, and the responses, the doubling down and the walking back, we still won't know until voters go and pull the lever for their preferred candidate. >
was the stronger leader, compared to 37% believing that about the president. simon rosenberg is president and founder of indiana think tank and advocacy organization, former adviser to president clinton. ben ferguson, host of the ben ferguson show. across the board the folks believe mitt romney won this debate and it's starting to move some independent, undecide -d voters into mitt romney's column. the question is, ben, whether that will last and how mitt romney capitalizes on that. >> he capital hraoeu capital cap capitalizes on it with what he did last night. what is different than four years ago when barack obama took the stage in mississippi he came out with grand ideas about all of us coming together and how we are going to cut the deficit in half and the world will like us again, and how we are going to get out of iraq and afghanistan. guess what, now he's going to run on what he's done over the last four years and there is not a lot he can point to to say that they were successful. that's what got him in trouble last night. if mitt romney does this the next couple of debates and he
drives the gym to get. many catholic groups are most notable in networks led by sister simone and the nuns on the bus have been vocal critics of the ryan budget which would cut spending of social services. republicans have been heavily influenced by the tea party movement in the past three years, and the tea party espouses of course that government should be far less responsible for providing the service. they believe that when the government provides social welfare it creates a culture of dependency among americans but i was struck that paul ryan use those words talk about welfare reform. so the american values survey asked americans whether they were more likely to agree that government policy and helping the poor served as a critical safety net or whether they create a culture of dependency where people are provided with too many handouts. so figure nine shows the percentage of americans were more likely to say that those policies create a culture of dependency. it's relatively few, only 32% of americans say social welfare policies create a culture of dependency. there is a
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)